When you pick up a book written by fellow Christchurch crime writer, Paul Cleave, you can be assured of a great read. His thrillers not only give you a terrific ride  through the often disturbing life of the characters, they can make you smile on nearly every page, at least for those of us with a slightly dark sense of humour. This is no easy thing to achieve.

5 mins alone

At the moment there’s a good debate on the value of restorative justice in New Zealand.  RJ conferences put the victim and offender together as a healing experience for the former and an opportunity for redemption for the latter. I over simplify, but you get the drift.

As Cleave’s title suggests, the premise of the book is a little different. It’s about the desire of many victims of crime, to have their five minutes alone with those who have wronged them, in effect to impart a bit of The Old Testament philosophy of an ‘eye for an eye’.

Ngaio Marsh award winner Cleave puts two main characters from former books together. One is Theodore Tate a cop who’s trying to get his life back on track after the death of his daughter and a wife who has seen better mental health. It’s Tate’s job to detect who’s killing the criminals in this story. The other is Carl Schroder an ex cop who was tormented by delusional Joe in The Cleaner and Joe Victim. Schroder is not only psychologically damaged goods, this lone wolf has a bullet lodged in his brain, inoperable and effectively a ticking time bomb on his life. He’ll never know his last seconds until it’s too late. So why not use his knowledge of crime, criminals and victims to give victims the justice so many don’t get from the system? It’s fair to say Carl Schroder’s idea of a restorative justice conference is not quite what the system intends. But good old Carl doesn’t quite get everything right. Death befalls the innocent people – those Carl is trying to help while his old mate Tate is responsible for putting an end to the unknown vigilante.

But in typical Cleave plotting, Tate has, as the cops say, “form” of his own. When the story begins only Tate (and readers of Cleave’s other books) know this secret. But don’t bet too much money on that remaining hidden. As it lurks in the background of Tate’s detection work and motivation, it makes for a fascinating read.

Cleave has written eight internationally best selling crime stories and been a finalist for the prestigous 2014 Edgar Award. Don’t be surprised if Five minutes alone is an award winner. As much as I enjoyed Joe Victim, I thought this one was even better.